Just One Trip

...

Just One Trip is a game I made alongwith the programming and art team at Guerilla Tea for the Global Game Jam, a 48 hour game jam held arond the world in particular we took part at the Dundee site of the Scottish Game Jam.

Platforms:


Just One Trip is a game I made alongwith the programming and art team at Guerilla Tea for the Global Game Jam, a 48 hour game jam held arond the world in particular we took part at the Dundee site of the Scottish Game Jam.

Following from the theme, "We don't see things as they are, we see them as we are.", the game we created focuses on the how the perceptions of the world change as they cope (or fail to cope) with addiction. A very interesting and dark concept which we agreed from the start would be focused on producing an artistic experience as much as a game. However you can read more about the game itself over on my blog.

My own responsibilities for the duration of the project mainly involved the design and production of the three puzzle rooms along with maintaining the Mercurial repository and guiding the team on it's effective use. The puzzle rooms consisted of a basic jumping challenge where you jump from platform to platform, a button mashing challenge where you have to break down a brick wall by clicking on it and a pendulum challenge where you have to move past swinging pendulums without being knocked off. Key to the game was the fact the puzzles needed to be procedural to avoid becoming too boring and the difficulty had to be adjusted dynamically and measurably.

The main challenge with this project, as with any game jam, is time-management - particularly having spent a large amount of time brainstorming the game idea and, of course, needing time to polish, test and package the game prior to submission. It was key that I prioritised my objectives to get the maximum amount of work done within the 48 hour period. Which given the prototype featured all 3 puzzles fleshed out with variable difficulty and I had some time for extra bits and pieces, I would consider successfully done. Another key concern was that the 3 programmers on the project could quickly start working collaboratively and that efficiency and speed was maintained throughout. The use of the distributed source control system, Mercurial, allowed us to store the remote copy of the repository on a USB stick whilst a full history was maintained on each local repository. This was combined with efficient design and planning practices which avoided any conflicts in implementation, particularly as the path generation had to fit the puzzle room seamlessly at the end.